Before You Query ​- Tips

Be Calm and Query On

I’ll admit when I started the process, I thought the most difficult part would be finding the right agent to query. Just goes to show you how much I know – zilch, zip, zero. Querying is NOT for the faint of heart. But, be encouraged––I’m going to give you my tips and what I’ve learned, so far in the process.

TIPS:

1. Get organized – to help you streamline the query process. 

  • Make sure all your materials are completed, edited, & ready to use. DO NOT query until they are. (Completed Manuscript; Synopsis, Pitch, Author Bio, and a frame-work query letter you can personalize to each agent.
  • Make sure you have some method for keeping up with your queries. You need to be aware of the agent and agencies they represent – you can only query one agent in the same agency at a time. I use Query Tracker to keep up with mine (more on that later).
  • Before you get query – research about agents, your genre, and familiarize yourself with the different types of submissions (snail mail, email, form) More on those later.

2. Find your agency/agent/publisher resources––some great places to start:

 3.  Select a number of agents/publishers you want to query.

  1. Familiarize yourself with the agent: read her profile, Twitter account, Website and get a good understanding of what type of queries she or he is seeking. Knowing your agent before you write that query letter makes all the difference.
  2. Know how to format your materials for submission via email, mail, and online.
  3. Make sure you read and follow the agents specific guidelines for submissions, including what must be in the query, email, and formatting. It is different for each agent.

 4. Be realistic and patient.

Do NOT expect a fast turnaround. Average time vary from agent to agents but don’t be dismayed to know that it can take 4-8 weeks for any response.

Stayed tuned, I’ll cover how to format your materials for each method of submission in the next post.

What has been your querying experience?

I’d love to hear your comments. Talk to me. Tell me your story. I’m all ears and look for me on Facebook Page at SheilaMcIntyreGoodPinterestBloglovinTwitter@sheilamgood, Contently, and Instagram. You can follow my reviews on Amazon and Goodreads.

 

 

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What’s Your IP Address?

ipa
One thing is for sure, when you’re in the midst of a long-term recovery, you will get bored out of your mind. Top these circumstances with 2-3 days of snow and ice – someone is going to break the rules. Did I mention – me? To say I’ve been stretching the doctor’s instructions bit is an understatement.facebookhomescreenimage
Pardon my digression; the squirrels are playing havoc with my brain.

Back to the point of this post. Do you know your IP address IP (Internet protocol)? It is a unique number for your computer and links to all of your online activity.

It’s how a Macy’s ad, with the very thing you’re shopping for, just happens to show up on Facebook or other sites you might visit. It’s how Google and other search engines track what you like – through algorithms and your IP address. And, it’s how hackers find us – not that we’ve heard much about hacking lately?

More to the point, it’s why a suspect’s computer is confiscated and turned over for a forensics examination, following a crime.  “Your honor, may I present Exhibit C into evidence. This will show that the defendant completed a search on, how to choke someone, undetectable, poisons, how to break a person’s neck, and how to get away with murder, no less than 200 times.”

You get the idea, but why do you care? Well, knowing one’s IPA is also helpful when determining if your computer or the information within has been compromised. For example, in 2005 my identity was stolen online. The culprits were tracked through an IPA to Amsterdam – a mega site for stolen identities. And just today, I attempted to sign in to Facebook. A message appeared:

“Your account has been locked due to a suspicious login attempt.”  They provided the time, IPA, and location (Charlotte) of the incident. “Was this you? “They asked.

I wasn’t certain, but it prompted me to investigate. I got things straightened out, not that being locked out of Facebook was of concern – it wasn’t, but that’s a subject for another day.

If you want to find out more on the topic, as well as your own IP Address, check out these resources:

  1. IP 101: The Basics of IP Addresses
  2. What is my IP Address.com
  3. How a Hacker Might Exploit Your IP Address
  4. Computer Evidence Recovery
  5. Internet Defamation

 

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Join the conversation. Talk to me or tell me your story. I’m all ears.