No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

All Writers Need Encouragement and the Occasional Win

Photo courtesy of Google & www.bigeducationape.blogspot.com

bigeducationape.blogspot.com

All writers, regardless of their level of expertise, need encouragement and the occasional pat on the back. Today,  I awoke to a pat on the back and a congratulatory email.

“Congratulations! Thank you for your submission to Donut Factory. We would be delighted to include “Maggie’s New Beginning” in the upcoming Fall 2016 print issue, as well as the 2016 year-end collection.”

To say I’m thrilled is insufficient. This story is one of my favorites and one I always believed I would, eventually, find a home. Thank you Donut Factory Press.

Check out their latest issue, here or by clicking the image below.
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Do you have news to share? I’d love to hear about it.

I’d love to hear your comments. Talk to me. Tell me your story and look for me on Facebook at SheilaMGood,  PinterestBloglovinTwitter@sheilamgood, Contently, and Instagram. You can follow my reviews on Amazon and Goodreads.

 

Stories to Share and Author Highlights

Time to ShareIt’s time again to showcase writers and their stories. I read many publications and when I find a story that moves me, makes laugh, or stays with me for days – I like to share it with everyone.

First up are two authors from Carver Magazine, Summer 2016.

Restoration by Ann Joslin Williams – She is the author of the novel Down From Cascom Mountain, the short story collection The Woman in The Woods, which won the Spokane Prize for Short Fiction, and the  director of the MFA Program in Writing at the University of New Hampshire. (Carver Magazine).

Daughters by Tayler Heuston – Taylor received her MFA from North Carolina State University. The winner of the 2015 Kore Press Short Fiction Award, her fiction has appeared in At Length MagazineTwo Serious Ladies, and NANO Fiction. (Carver Magazine).

From Oxford American Magazine – BLAISE ST. CLAIR By  Rebecca Wells. She is the author of one of my all time favorite books and movies, Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood. The story I’m sharing today is an excerpt from her novel in progress,  Blaise St. Clair’s Book of Being, (Oxford American Magazine).

I loved this story and if this line doesn’t intrigue you, nothing will.

“When Blaise St. Clair was able to breathe past her fear, the conversations were as gorgeous and as fragile as monarch butterflies at dusk on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. They were lamentations. They were lullabies. They were reveilles.” 

A Shirt Tale By Supie DunbarWOW 2016 Flash Fiction, Runner up. I liked this story. Sometimes we need a sign, a bit of encouragement to make us do something, even if it’s an empty shirt.

Supie became a writer after she retired. Her poetry and flash fiction are published in print  (Vine Leaves Literary JournalBlotterature Literary Magazine) and online (A Quiet CourageThe Voices Project).

If you enjoyed these stories as much as I did, please share your thoughts with the authors and pass them on for others to enjoy. Don’t forget to check out the Call for Submissions in the sidebar. Maybe your story will be the next one I highlight. How did you like the stories?

I’d love to hear your comments. Talk to me. Tell me your story and look for me on Facebook at SheilaMGood,  PinterestBloglovinTwitter@sheilamgood, Contently, and Instagram. You can follow my reviews on Amazon and Goodreads.

How to Ask for Book Reviews

 

Plot-Twist-cartoon

Heather Jackson at WriteOnSisters.com/

For every book I read, I leave a review on both Amazon and Goodreads. It’s important to let authors know the things we liked or didn’t like about their book.

 

I’m by no means, one of the top 100 Amazon Reviewers, but recently requests asking for a review has increased; most of the time, I try to help out a fellow writer, but it’s becoming more difficult as I try to focus on my current work in progress (WIP).

If you visit my Amazon page, you’ll find my reviews are, by far, on books I’ve chosen to read – for pleasure, on the craft of writing, research, or non-fiction books of interest. If you check out my blog or Bio, you can tell my preferred genre.

I’ve noticed in a few of the requests I’ve received; the author has not done the necessary ‘homework’ to find the best reviewer for their genre, and I think that’s important. Asking a fantasy author to review my crime novel is not going to get me the review I hope to receive.

So, it thrilled me to read the guest post from one of Amazon’s top reviewersGisela Hausmann over at C.S. Lakin’s, Live, Write, Thrive.

In her post, Ms. Hausmann discusses, The 5 Most Common Mistakes Writers Make When Seeking Book Reviews. If you’re looking for someone to review your book, Gisela Hausmann’s guest post is worth reading and making notes.

What do you think? Do you offer reviews? What has been your experience?  I’d love to hear your comments. Talk to me. Tell me your story and look for me on Facebook at SheilaMGood,  PinterestBloglovinTwitter@sheilamgood, Contently, and Instagram. You can follow my reviews on Amazon and Goodreads.

 

Maybe Another Word for Indecision

The Daily Post Prompt: Write a new post in response to today’s one-word prompt. Maybe   images-3-min

Don’t you hate it when someone puts you on the spot with an unexpected invitation? I do and like many people tend to fall back on the old reliable, “Maybe.”

It’s a word (answer) we believe will help get us out of making a decision or a commitment we’re certain, in the back of our minds, we aren’t, can’t, or won’t  keep. We don’t want to hurt feelings so,  “Maybe” gives us a way out. Only, it’s not a way out; it’s indecision.

“Decision is a sharp knife that cuts clean and straight. Indecision a dull one that hacks and tears and leaves ragged edges behind it.” Gordon Graham Tweet this

Now, I’m not preaching to the choir or holding myself up as a decision guru. When I worked, my decisions were quick and decisive, but take me out to dinner and this is what my decisions look like.”Maybe” has be2011-05-10-at-a-restaurant-minen my fall guy for many years.

“Maybe” has been my fall guy for many times. But, here’s the thing, it also leaves jagged edges behind.

Invitations stop, projects lay unfinished, and feelings are hurt. As I’ve gotten older, I do my best, to be honest with myself and say, “no” instead of “maybe.”  It isn’t always easy, but I have encouragement from one of my all-time favorite resources – a book by Manuel J. Smith, Ph.D.

When I say no, I feel guilty.  Since the day I discovered this book, I have kept it close by for easy access and referral. The very from page includes a Bill of Assertive Rights.

“You have the right to say, really No, without feeling guilty.” Manuel J. Smith Ph.D. Tweet this

The next time you’re tempted to say “maybe” want to say, “No” – be true to yourself; you have that right.

I’d love to hear your comments. Talk to me. Tell me your story and look for me on Facebook at SheilaMGood,  PinterestBloglovinTwitter@sheilamgood, Contently, and Instagram. You can follow my reviews on Amazon and Goodreads.